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Define Adult ADHD
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Adult ADHD with an inattentive predominance is a major overlap with being distractive. This website prefers terms that are accessible to the general public, rather than terms that are only understandable to trained psychologists. However, some of us are also diagnosed with ADHD, and it is useful to understand what it is and what the symptoms are.

As I understand it, ADHD is under-developed working memory or attention regulation. I see this as the inability to both do something and think about what I am doing at the same time. I can compare it to being near-sighted, but rather with regard to time and meta-cognition rather than eyesight.

It just so happens that the official definition in the DSM V is easily understandable. Adults are necessarily ADHD as children. Many cases, such as my own, were undiagnosed as children probably because were were already of the inattentive type when we were young. The DSM definition is reprinted below for reference.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (314.0X) (F90.X)

[This is a near-verbatim copy of the DSM V description of ADHD both for adults and children. Titles between square brackets have been added.]

A. [Predominence Inattentive, Hyperactive or Combined]

A persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development, as characterized by (1) and/or (2).

A1.  [Predominance Inattentive]

Six (or more) of the following symptoms have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with developmental level and that negatively impacts directly on social and academic/occupational activities ( Note: The symptoms are not solely a manifestation of oppositional behavior, defiance, hostility, or failure to understand tasks or instructions. For older adolescents and adults (age 17 and older), at least five symptoms are required.) :

A2. [Predominance Hyperactivity / Impulsivity]

Six (or more) of the following symptoms have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with developmental level and that negatively impacts directly on social and academic/occupational activities (Note: The symptoms are not solely a manifestation of oppositional behavior, defiance, hostility, or a failure to understand tasks or instructions. For older adolescents and adults (age 17 and older), at least five symptoms are required.):

B. Prior to Age 12

Several inattentive or hyperactive-impulsive symptoms were present prior to age 12 years

C. Two or More Settings

Several inattentive or hyperactive-impulsive symptoms are present in two or more settings (e.g., at home, school, or work; with friends or relatives; in other activities).

D. Interference with Quality of Life

There is clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with, or reduce the quality of, social, academic, or occupational functioning.

E. Not Explained by Other Disorder

The symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder and are not better explained by another mental disorder (e.g., mood disorder, anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, personality disorder, substance intoxication or withdrawal).

Particularities

Specify whether:

Specify if: In partial remission: When full criteria were previously met, fewer than the full criteria have been met for the past 6 months, and the symptoms still result in impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning.

Specify current severity: